How Millennials Feel About Friendship, Work and Having Children

stewwnWhat most shocked me in the often-startling twenty-year study of Wharton College graduates was that only half as many now plan to have children. Both women and men, in equal numbers, felt that way, yet their reasons are different, according to Baby Bust author, Stewart D. Friedman. Whereas millennial women, at least at Wharton in 1992, felt “motherhood fulfilled their need to help others” more now believe that they can serve the greater good by succeeding at work.

On the other hand, for millennial men, “doing good” is increasingly connected to creating greater BabyBustCover+NoBorder-662x1024balance and harmony between work and family. They have become more egalitarian in relationships, including at work, and are less likely to think of themselves as the sole breadwinner, not surprisingly. Yet those of both sexes who wanted to be parents feel that they, “don’t see a clear path toward it,” discovered Friedman.

Sleeping withT+c-L._AA220_What Are Some OF Their Top Worries?

They are more burdened by college debt, believe that work is more competitive today, and that they are less likely to attain their career goals than Gen Xers so they are more focused on job security. Plus the recognize that they’ll have to work about 14 more hours per week than 20 years ago.

Consequently they more willing to accept what Friedman dubs “extreme jobs” and to job hop to get ahead. No wonder Dan Schawbel’s Promote Yourself is selling so well.

Following Their Passion Through Work Feels Farther Off

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